All Articles with the Category: Sedimentary Geochemistry & Organic Geochemistry

Oldest evidence for animals found by UCR researchers

"Researchers at the University of California, Riverside, have found the oldest clue yet of animal life, dating back at least 100 million years before the famous Cambrian explosion of animal fossils. The study , led by Gordon Love , a professor in UCR’s Department of Earth Sciences, was published today in Nature Ecology & Evolution....

Methane Muted: How Did Early Earth Stay Warm?

"For at least a billion years of the distant past, planet Earth should have been frozen over but wasn’t. Scientists thought they knew why, but a new modeling study from the Alternative Earths team of the NASA Astrobiology Institute has fired the lead actor in that long-accepted scenario." Read More

Oxygen Was Once A Sometime Thing on Earth

"An understanding of the history of Earth is incomplete without an understanding of how and why the planet developed an oxygenated atmosphere. A team of scientists, including Timothy Lyons, a distinguished professor of biogeochemistry, reports new isotopic data in Science Advances that illustrate how photosynthetic cyanobacteria temporarily spiked concentrations of oxygen around 2.5 billion years...

Tracking Life’s Evolution

"How life’s evolution can be tracked using ancient lipid biomarkers preserved in petroleum and rocks is the topic of a free public lecture at the University of California, Riverside. Gordon Love , a professor of biogeochemistry at UC Riverside, will give the hour-long talk starting at 7 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 12, in Room A265, Bourns...

Why Didn't Animals Appear Sooner in Earth's History?

"Geologists are letting the air out of a nagging mystery about the development of animal life on Earth. Scientists have long speculated as to why animal species didn’t flourish sooner, once sufficient oxygen covered the Earth’s surface. Animals first appeared and began to prosper at the end of the Proterozoic period, about 600 to 700...

Researchers Quantify Toxic Ocean Conditions During Major Extinction 93.9 Million Years Ago

"Oxygen in the atmosphere and ocean rose dramatically about 600 million years ago, coinciding with the first proliferation of animal life. Since then, numerous short-lived biotic events — typically marked by significant climatic perturbations — took place when oxygen concentrations in the ocean dipped episodically." Read More

Rethinking Early Atmospheric Oxygen

"A research team of biogeochemists at the University of California, Riverside has provided a new view on the relationship between the earliest accumulation of oxygen in the atmosphere, arguably the most important biological event in Earth history, and its relationship to the sulfur cycle." Read More

Oxygen's Ups and Downs in the Early Atmosphere and Ocean

"Most researchers imagine the initial oxygenation of the ocean and atmosphere to have been something like a staircase, but with steps only going up. The first step, so the story goes, occurred around 2.4 billion years ago, and this, the so-called Great Oxidation Event, has obvious implications for the origins and evolution of the first...

Oxygen's challenge to early life

"The conventional view of the history of the Earth is that the oceans became oxygen-rich to approximately the degree they are today in the Late Ediacaran Period (about 600 million years ago) after staying relatively oxygen-poor for the preceding four billion years. But biogeochemists at the University of California, Riverside have found evidence that shows...

Geophysicists Claim Conventional Understanding of Earth's Deep Water Cycle Needs Revision

"A popular view among geophysicists is that large amounts of water are carried from the oceans to the deep mantle in “subduction zones,” which are boundaries where the Earth’s crustal plates converge, with one plate riding over the other. But now geophysicists led by the University of California, Riverside’s Harry Green , a distinguished professor...

New Picture of Ancient Ocean Chemistry Argues for Chemically Layered Water

"A research team led by biogeochemists at the University of California, Riverside has developed a detailed and dynamic three-dimensional model of Earth’s early ocean chemistry that can significantly advance our understanding of how early animal life evolved on the planet." Read More
Search